Saturday, April 2, 2011

The trouble with...

...cordon-training grapevines is the number of cuts, wounds really, that are inflicted upon the vine every year at pruning time. Potentially, each cut is indeed a wound through which any of a number of pathogens could enter into the vine e.g. the fungal disease Eutypa lata.
In the best possible scenario, for the cordon-trained vine in the above photograph, the vine has a minimum of 20 pruning wounds; one to remove one of last year's shoots and one to form this year's new 2 bud spur in each of its ten different positions. In comparison, the head-trained/cane-pruned vines in Vinoland have a mere 6 wounds; one to remove last years cane, one at the end of the new cane and one to form this year's 2 bud spur. The less wounds, the less chance of infection.
However, sometimes large wounds are unavoidable and that's why I have been known to daub Dreft on large cuts. You can see two really large wounds in the photo but on the bright side, this particular vine now has two brand new spurs on this one cordon alone.
Of course, there are many other considerations for choosing one style of training over another, but I personally think vine health is one of the, if not the, most important.
Anyhow...congratulations to the folks at Far Niente on the budbreak of their 2011 Chardonnay vintage.

5 comments:

About Last Weekend said...

Hi there, nice to meet you. Jody here, came through Vinogirl in England. I'm a kiwi living in Oakland, used to live in London. Love your blog and the post about the wounding. I didn't realise there was so much "pain" for the branches but I will be much more appreciative of their offerings next time. Was just in Healdsburg, the best weekend away ever...

About Last Weekend said...

....Jody here again. sorry came through Knackered Mothers Club. You are Vinogirl! (see I already need a glass of wine and it's only 3.30 in Tahoe!) Have a lovely Sunday!

phlegmfatale said...

You know, reading about the process makes me all the more appreciative of a good glass of wine. It's apparently a very complex process. Here's to 'em!

And as for what Jody said--- LOVE Healdsburg. Had a glorious week there a few years back. Very nice place and I hope to go again. :)

Vinogirl said...

Jody: Welcome to Vinsanity.
I might have made it all sound a bit dramatic, but although they are wine grapes it's still farming - and things can, and sometimes do, go horribly wrong. Just enjoy your glass of wine and don't worry too much about the vines - there are thousands of viticulturists doing that for you!

Phlemmy: Yes, here's to grapevines and the potentially wonderful wines they may produce.
Healdsburg is a very nice town.

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