Thursday, March 3, 2011

Kept in the dark.

Somewhere, in between working, pruning, cleaning, cooking, dog-walking and sleeping, I have to find time for school.
I am really enjoying the darkroom class that I am taking. I have found that developing prints is addictive, and coaxing my brain to think in black & white (with the emphasis on tone and texture rather than colour) has been quite an exercise. However, I am a little frustrated that my chosen subject matters are somewhat limited, hence the picture above of my pruning shears and gloves. I really should get out more. Ho hum!

15 comments:

monkey said...

it was third time lucky for me, but this week i had a break through and developed some excellent prints if i do say so my self. i will keep them for when your over next month but bring your camera and we may do a little developing im sure there will even more subject matter.

Vinogirl said...

Monkey: It's a date...I was planning on bringing my SLR and B&W film with me anyway.

Cesar Valverde said...

Like the gloves and shears, and especially the high contrast...

Also- the imperfect compostion with right hand glove running out of the frame is good and sticks.

Ever read Camera Lucida by R. Barthes?

Thomas said...

Don't worry about your chosen subjects: I hold dear the Van Gogh painting of his decrepit shoes at his bedside. Something in it touches me.

On another note: they still teach darkroom technique???

Lord Roby said...

Just had a hit from Zamboanga...Beat that Vinogirl !!

Thud said...

Me like guns and beer.

Vinogirl said...

Cesar: Thanks! No, I haven't read that book - would you recommend it?

Thomas: My teacher used that very, Van Gogh, painting last semester to illustrate still life.
Yes, some places including Napa Valley College, still teach darkroom. I somehow get the feeling that you fall, like Vinomaker and Thud, into the "why bother" school of thinking...

Thud: I'm making some pretty pictures for you to look at.

Cesar Valverde said...

Yep. It's good and interesting, surprisingly sentimental for Barthes; meditating on his late mother. Particularly good are his examinations of great photographs having a particular detail, often very small, that sticks in the mind and creates interest.

But Susan Sontag's 'On Photography' (I think that's what it's called). Is the best I've read on the subject.

Thomas said...

Oh, no. I don't fall into the "why bother" camp. I'm just amazed that darkroom is still taught, and more amazed that the chemicals are available without having to sign an affidavit of some sort.

One of my dearest friends was a professional photographer and teacher at School of Visual Arts. She contracted hepatitis from over exposure to the chemicals (no pun intended).

My wife is a damned good photographer, and even she now pooh, poohs the chemical route, although she misses her analog cameras. We each spent a number of years in the audio visual field, producing 35mm multi-projector slide shows about 1,000 years ago.

Do Bianchi said...

very psyched to see your prints! Your digital photography is pretty amazing as it is!

more please...

monkey said...

we teach darkroom techniques but not so much as the digital. in the first few months we get the students making pin hole cameras out of shoe boxes, it excellent stuff and the prints come out great some better than those done with a regular camera. im really into the developing process and think it would get me adicted if it wasnt so tempermental. you should try the pin hole stuff its easy to do at home and you can experiment alot.

Vinogirl said...

Cesar: Ooh, I dunno! Sounds a bit deep "meditating on his dead mother" and all that!

Thomas: Yes, it is amazing that the chemicals are even allowed across the California state line...and the amount of water you use in develping the film, and then the prints, is truly hair-raising.

2B: I will endeavour to deliver.

Monkey: Like a camera obscura? Did some photograms, but can't say I found them very interesting.

monkey said...

a good photogram is all about the selection of the object you choose, for more interesting results use a negative aswell and you get nice layers, but again its not an exact science. pin hole cameras are the most simple of cameras,not as detailed as a camera obscura. A shoe box blacked out inside, a tiny pin hole with a little tape to cover it while you set up and photo paper inside. experiment with the exposure time and you can get some really nice prints if not a bit arty.

Thud said...

do you rub together sticks to start up your stove?...I'm firmly with vinomaker

Cesar Valverde said...

Oh yes... deep as anything. But marginally more comprehensible than everything else he wrote.