Saturday, May 23, 2015

Oy vey!

And speaking of sweet red wine.
It is with some frequency that Americans, of a certain age, feel the need to share with me tales of their underage drinking adventures.  More often than not Manischewitz was the wine of choice in their teenage exploits. However, honourable mention should go to other wines such as; Boone's Farm, Annie Greensprings, Bali Hai, Blue Nun and Lancers.  Luckily, I grew up drinking wines with vastly different flavour profiles, although, in full disclosure, I have had both Blue Nun and Lancers in the past.
Manischewitz is really not that bad: it has that typical Concord grape nose (like sticking your schnoz into a jar of Concord grape jam), and that typical Concord grape taste (like chewing a massive wad of grape flavoured chewing gum). It is sweet; it is weird; it is better (read, swallowable) than Conundrum.  And if you happen to prefer that your glass of grape juice comes with a little bit of a kick (11% alcohol), then Manischewitz is the drink for you.  And it is kosher.
Truth is, there are some fantastic kosher wines coming out of Israel these days.  I have met a couple of Israeli winemakers (they were visiting TWWIAGE) and have tried some Israeli wines - of note a Yarden, 2010 Merlot (Galilee) - nice folks, decent wines.  And it's not like the Israelis are new to the wine business.  There is a long history of winemaking in Israel, as is reported in this Haaretz.com article (kindly forwarded to me by New Hampshire Wineman), which tells of the unearthing of a 1400 year old wine press in Jerusalem.  Those thirsty Israelis were making wine long before Manischewitz took a native American grape and produced kosher wine in New York state.  I love wine history.

11 comments:

Dennis Tsiorbas said...

:)

Dennis Tsiorbas said...

Considering your 'Conundrum' with
diabetes, I could resist!

Thomas said...

All of Palestine and surrounding land was a wine-producing region a few thousand years ago---and a good deal of it still is.

VG: if a fellow named Philip Steinschreiber still produces wine in California, see if you can find him. He made wine at Yardem first, in the 1980s. I tried to interest him in investing in the small winery I started here, but he thought I wasn't microbiologically sound enough--in the winery, that is.

Vinogirl said...

NHW: Ha, and it's a study from Israel to boot.

Tomasso: This fella?
http://www.watermarkwine.com/pages/PhilSteinschriber.pdf

Thomas said...

That's him.

Thud said...

There was a chap over there turned water into wine, not sure of sugar levels.

Vinogirl said...

Tomasso: Apparently he ended up in Napa where we are all microbiologically sound.

Thud: He wouldn't have much to work with here during our drought.

Thomas said...

Thud: The name of my winery was Cana Vineyards.

Named after the marriage feast. Only problem was that when I tried to make wine that way it didn't work.

Vinogirl said...

Tomasso: Good name.

Thomas said...

VG: A close friend who was a priest (he has since died) rtecommended the name when we were thinking of what to call the winery. I liked it immediately. Our logo was a stain-glass design look.

Thud said...

Its a great name.